New Polls and Commentary on 2020 Presidential Candidates are Released  

Reuters; AP

Reuters; AP

 

We ran the numbers: There are 1767 news articles covering this topic. 49% (871) are left leaning, 36% (637) center, 15% (259) right leaning.

Recent surveys reveal the state of candidates in polls regarding the upcoming 2020 election, and new commentary is released on select candidates. Left-leaning articles detail information about voter demographics and candidates according to the most recent polls, while right-leaning articles focus on Democratic candidate Joe Biden’s role in the recent Ukraine scandal.

 

A left-leaning article by The New York Times breaks down the findings from The New York Times and Siena College surveys, reporting that Trump still remains competitive in the states likeliest to decide his re-election. Trump leads Warren by two points among registered voters, but trails behind Biden by an average of two points. The article also reports that the President still has a strong lead among white, working-class voters while Democrats have made little progress towards winning back these voters that gave Trump a decisive advantage in 2016.

 

A centrist report by NPR notes that although Biden has a better standing than  before in the general election, a poll last week revealed he is in fourth place in Iowa, which is the first state where voting takes place in the Democratic primary campaign. NPR also states that there is still time for non-front-runner candidates, such as Buttigieg, to break into the top tier as long as they start right away with initiatives such as regional offices and increased volunteers on the ground. 

 

A right-leaning article by The Washington Examiner highlights that Fox News anchor Steve Hilton accused a liberal news contributor of covering up Biden’s dealings with Ukraine. The article reports that Hilton said Biden “supervised billions of dollars of aid that went from the U.S. taxpayer to Ukraine. Much of that went to Burisma, a gas company that was paying his son.”


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